Skip to main content

Full text of "Wellesley news"

See other formats


AEW5...J 




Vol. 1. No. 29. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 1902. 



Price, 5 Cents. 



COLLEG E CAL ENDAR. 

Saturday, May 31. A platform dance giv- 
en by the Junior members of Society Tau 
Zeta Epsilon. 

Monday, June 2. Philadelphia Club 
picnic. 

Tuesday, June 8. Southern Club picnic. 

Friday, June 6. Tree Day. 

Saturday, June 7. Promenade Concert at 
Tupelo given by the Phi Sigma Society. 

Sunday, June 8. Rev. Allen E. Cross of 
Boston will preach. 

Monday, June 9. Dr. Barker's Tea at the 
Eliot from 4 to 5. Evening: Dance given by 
Society Zeta Alpha at the Zeta Alpha House. 

Friday, June 13. Dress Rehearsal of 
Senior Play. Evening. 

Saturday, June 14. Shakespeare Play : 
A Midsummer Night's Dream. ( In case of 
TcJn,.4he^>erier*uaiioe will take place June 
16. ) 

Sunday, June 15. President Raymond of 
Union College, Schenectady, N. Y., will 
preach. 

Monday, June 16, evening, Inauguration 
of officers of the Alliance Francaise. 

Tuesday, June 17. "Float." 

Wednesday, June 18. Shakespeare Play. 

Thursday evening, June 19. Senior Class 
Supper. 

Friday afternoon, June 20. From four 
until six, Garden Party. 

Friday evening, June 20. Senior Play. 

Saturday, June 21. Class reunions. 

Three-P. M. Glee Club Concert 
Five P. M. Tree Day Dances. 
Evening. President's Reception. 

Sunday, June 22. Baccalaureate Sunday. 

Monday afternoon, June 23. Commence- 
ment Exercises. 

Monday evening, June 23. College Con- 
cert. 

Tuesday, June 24. Alumna; Day. 

The Hunnewell Cup. 

It was announced informally on Field 
Day, that Mr. Hunnewell had pre- 
sented the Rowing Club with a. $100 Cup, 
to be competed for annually, by the four 
class crews. Also, Mr. Hunnewell has 
stated that the members of the winning 
crew, including the coxswain, will each be 
presented with individual cups, each year. 
This announcement was greeted with much 
enthusiasm. The designs for the cup were 
submitted this week. 



THEATR E BU LLETIN. 

Tremont " Prince of Pilsen " 

Hollis, James T. Powers, 

" The Messenger Boy" 
Symphony Hall Pop Concerts 



SENIOR SOCIAL. 

On Monday afternoon, June second, the 
Senior Social took place in the Barn. As is 
customary at the Senior Social a meeting of 
the Academic Council forms the entertain- 
ment of the afternoon. The petition dis- 
cussed at this meeting was concerning the 
advisability of allowing a senior dance dur- 
ing commencement week. We quote the 
petition in full: 
To the Faculty of Wellesley College. 

A. Know all men by these presents that 
the class of nineteen hundred and two 
sends greeting to the Faculty of 
Wellesley College: 

I. Whereas, the class of 1902 wishes to 

thank profusely the Faculty for 
their unutterable, unbounded, un- 
precedented, unprejudiced kindness 
to the tlass, and 
II. Whereas, the class of 1902 wishes in 
someway to show their abject de- 
votion to the aforesaid Faculty — for 
their prementioned benevolence. 

B. Be it here resolved, that 

I. The class of 1902 grant to the Faculty 
of Wellesley further opportunity to 
show this afore-praised philan- 
thropy, 
a. This identical opportunity to be 
granted to the Faculty only after 
a unanimous vote of two-thirds of 
the unengaged members of the 
class. 
II. Wliereas, as yet, no entertainment has 
been provided for the evening of 
June 21st, and 

III. Whereas the afore-mentioned class of 

1'902 desire no omissions, allowing 
of recuperation, to appear on their 
commencement programme, and 

IV. Whereas, also, it has been deemed 

most courteous to keep from result- 
ing melancholia the numerous at- 
tending guests, whom such a void 
would overwhelm, and 
V. Whereas it is judged dishonorable to 
omit expected entertainment, since 

a. The aforesaid numerous attending 

guests consist of our own and 
other people's brothers. 

b. Our own and other people's broth- 

ers have come from various and 
unlimited distances. 

c. These same mutual brothers have 

arrived and remained at unwonted 
expense, and by extremes of 
economy. 

C. Therefore be it resolved, that 

I. Some jovial, felicitous entertainment, 
at least one during the week, be 
provided for our own and other 
people's brothers, hence, 

II. We, parties of the first part, do advise 

and petition that you, parties of the 



second part, do magnanimously 
grant to us, parties of the first part 
the following humble request: to 
wit : 

That we, the class of 1902 may and 
shall give to our aforesaid numer- 
ous attending guests (our own 
and other people's brothers) a 
dance, in the only and original 
Barn, on the previously, deplor- 
ably vacant Saturday evening. 
D. (P.S.) In order that the Faculty may 
thoroughly realize the absolute 
practicability of this unprece- 
dented request, the following 
details are humbly added for 
their elucidation: 

I. In regard to the requisite abundance 

of dressing-rooms available for 
use: 

a. By a "personal interview with the 

weather bureau at Washington, 
May 24th, 1902, it was ascertained 
that the weather for the afore- 
discussed Saturday will at least 
. be tepid so that a superfluity of 
wrappings will not be essential, 
so that 

b. The girls will find ample space for 

their shawl-lets in the rooms at 
the laterals of the stage. These 
same to be stocked with, 

1. Mirrors, i. e., hand-glasses none 

more than five inches in diame- 
ter. 

2. Pins, at least two sizes, perhaps two 

papers, 

3. Thread and needles only black and 

white. 

4. Thimble, one and perhaps two. 

5. Curling iron, electric, warranted 

non-conbustible, yet insured, 
c. The men may leave their bonnets in 
neat piles on either side of the ex- 
terior door. 

II. The expense will be immaterial, since 

a. The proposed refreshments will be 
light, perhaps a feeble ice or some 
ghostly lemonade served outside at 
the right hand corner of the left 
hand side of the Barn, under the 
hill. 

1. Such materials and method have 
been found economical at several 
late functions. 

b. The projected decorations will be 
most artless ; i. e. 

1. The fresh young faces of our own 
and other people's brothers blended 
with a lavish profusion of blossom- 
ing boughs and flowers in every 
cosy corner. 

2. In the open, only a few strident 
Japanese lanterns will be necessary 
to fill with rapture all the hearts of 
the attending mosquitoes. 



COL I/E G E NEWS 



College IRews, 



Press or N. A. Lindsey 4 Co., Boston. 



Scbsokiption Price— 50 cents per year, payable 
in advance. 

All correspondence should be addressed to Col- 
lege News, Wellesley, Mass. 



JESitor: flcai'S Esther abase. 
Business fltonanev: Caroline TKHriflbt IRoqers. 



c. The music will also bA trifling. 



1 

■I 1 



class have decided to ask your 
aforesaid advice as to the efficacy 
of a pure plain hurdy-gurdy — or a 
mere pittance of stringed instru- 
ments. In this the class have no 
recommendation to make. 

III. It is hoped and advised that the even- 

ing meal shall be served early on 
the prementioned night, in which 
case 
The festivities may begin at 7, 
P. M., and relinquish at 9.15 also 
P. M; Thus giving us time to 
linger homeward with our own 
and other people's brothers — and 
yet dismiss the said brotherhood 
at an early hour. 

IV. Although it has been argued that the 

Barn will be crowded, yet 

IV. This argument does not hold, for 

a. All the girls do not have brothers. 

b. Such deficient maidens may take 
other people's brothers, thus 

All the brothers will be on exhi- 
bition. 

V. The class hopes to have two species 

of patronesses. 

a. Some members of the Faculty, of 
which the list will be posted later 
in the Faculty dressing-room. Mem- 
bers are requested to watch the 
index-board — the class cannot be 
responsible — other wise. 

b. Mothers — of some of our broth- 
ers. 

It is thought this would foster a 
home-like feeling on the part of 
our guests. 

VI. If it should be deemed requisite to 

postpone any function of the com- 
mencement programme to Saturday 
evening — the dance could come 
later — if such change be thought 
agreeable to our patronesses of the 
first class. 



Tiffany & Co. 



* 



_y 



Diamond and 
Gem Merchants 
Gold and Silver- 
smiths, 
Stationers, 
and Dealers 
in Artistic 
Merchandise 

CORRESPONDENCE 
INVITED . . 



Designs and 
Estimates 

Class Rings 
Fraternity Pins 
Class Cups 
Heraldic 
Engravings 
Boole Plates 
Etc., Etc. 



THE LENOX 

Boylston and Exeter Streets 
BOSTON 

ROMANY-GYPSY BAND 

From Sherry's. New York, Every Evening 



Therefore, hoping that the plans of 
the class may meet with the satis- 
faction, approbation, and extola- 
tion of the Faculty, I am 
Forever yours in cordial expectancy, 
Florence Natalie Hastings, 
Corresponding Secretary of 
the only class of 1902. 
June the second, in the year of our 
felicity, nineteen hundred and two. 



L'ALLIANCE FRANCAISE. 



The Alliance Francaise which has been in 
the process of organization for the last few 
weeks is now formed and will hold a recep- 
tion for the inauguration of officers, either 
on the evening of June 14 or 16, according 
to the date on which the Shakespeare 
Play takes place. The officers are as fol- 
lows: Honorary President, Miss Hazard ; 
President, Belle Schlesinger, '03 ; Vice- 
president, Annis Van Nuys, '03 ; Secretary, 
Ruth Whitney, '03; Treasurer, Eleanor Mac- 
donakV, • '04 ; Executive Committee, Mile. 
Lydie Caron, Florence Piper, Rosamund 
Clark. 

The National Association of the Alliance 
Francaise in Paris, has appointed Mile. 
Schaeys, head of our French Department at 
Wellesley, as delegate from their body. 
Mile. Schaiys has been deeply interested in 
organizing the Alliance Francaise at Welles- 
ley, and it is through her efforts that the 
movement has been started with such suc- 
cess. There are already between seventy 
and eighty members. The formation of the 
Alliance Francaise here is a matter of much 
interest, and a most commendable achieve- 
ment. It cannot but increase the interest 
in French Arts and Letters among the 
students and bring its members in contact 
with French people of note ; it will also 
stimulate an interest in conversation. 



Union Square 
New York. 



A lass from the South had a waist, 
Which was shapely, and dressed in 

good taste. 
Ker style was perfection 
With no need of correction 

And her mental qualities were 0. 
K. She had good judgment. She 
bought her Silks and Pongees at 

HATCH'S, 

Orientalist and Rug Merchants, 
43 and 45 Summer Street. 



ITL. 




ATENT SUSTAINED 




DELICIOUS DRINKS 
and DAINTY DISHES 
are made from 

BAKER'S 

BREAKFAST 

COCOA 




ABSOLUTELY PURE 

Unequaled for smooth- 
ness, delicacy, and flavor 

Our Choice Recipe Book 
will tell you how to make 
Fudge, and a great variety 
of dainty dishes, from our 
Cocoa and Chocolate. Sent 
FREE to any address Jw 



WALTER BAKER & CO. Limited 

Established 17S0 DORCHESTER, MASS. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



ALUMN/E NOTES. 



On March 25, 1902, at Seattle, Wash., Miss Delia Maria Taylor, 
'82, was married to Mr. Louis Gates Whittlesey. Mr. and Mrs. 
Whittlesey are "at home" 8Li)4 Eighth avenue, Seattle. 

Miss Sara Sydney Bullock, '80-'82, was married to Eev. Cary 
Franklin Moore of Fulton, Illinois, on April 30, 1902, at Lexington, 
Ky. 

Mrs. Helen Barrett Montgomery, 'S4, has just returned from an 
extended trip to Egypt, the Holy Land, Greece and Italy. In Greece 
Mrs. Montgomery had a very interesting time. A member of the 
party was seized with small-pox. The husband of the woman who 
was ill purchased a house with all its furnishings, where the party 
remained until the patient recovered. Then the house and every- 
thing in it was burned to the ground — new clothing being pur- 
chased by everyone. 

Miss Alice Ames Winter, '86, was the guest of Miss Olive Davis, 
'86. at Wilder over last Sundav. 



Miss Adelaide Denis, '87, and Miss Ruth Tracy, 1900, are doing 
advanced work in Mathematics with Professor Florian Cajori of 
Colorado College. 

Miss Carrie A. Mann, '93, has announced her engagement to Mr. 
William Spaulding of Brookline, Mass. 



Miss Flora H. Luther, Sp. '90-'92, has announced her engagement 
to Mr. L. F. Eaton. 



Miss Elizabeth X. Doonan, ('92-'93,) has announced her engage- 
ment to Mr. John H. Sheridan of Wellesley. 



Miss Caroline Fitz Randolph, '91, and Miss Corinne Wagner, '99, 
will sail for England June eleventh. The}' will spend the summer 
in the British Isles. 

Miss Bessie Smith, '95, has just returned to Wellesley, where 
she is staying with Mrs. Durant, after spending many weeks in 
travelling. Miss Smith has just accepted the position of Head 
Librarian of the new Carnegie Library in Dubuque. Iowa. 



Miss Sarah Lillian Swett, '96. was married to Dr. Josiah Wins- 
low Edgerly on April 2, 1902, at Pittsfield, N. H. The address of 
Mrs. Swett is 67S East 136th street, Xew York City. 



Miss Helen Sara Smith, '94-96. was married on October 1. 
at Red Wing, Minn., to Mr. Frank Victor Stone of Boston. 



1901. 



Miss Clara Hathorne Shaw, '97, spent last Sunday with Miss 
Lucy Flympton in Wellesley Hills. Miss Shaw will be in the 
vicinity of Boston until the eighth of June, when she returns to 
her work at the University of Chicago. 



Among the Alumnoe back for the early June festivities are, 
Misses Bertha Smith, Mary Davis, 1900, and Misses Alice Logan, 
Madeline Baxter, Annie Davis and Annie McCord. 1901. 



DEATHS. 



March S, 1902, at Rome, X. Y.,Mrs. Eleanor Sherwood Hopkins, 
'80-81. 

April 20, 1902, at West Newton, Mass., Mrs. Mary Whitcher 
Dow, '96. 



RIDIING HABITS 

of Every Description. 

LADIES' TAILOR 

and Habit Maker. 



SMYTHE, 



Colonial Oxfords 

In Patent Leatheb and Dull Kid, 

$3.50 AND $5.00 

H. B. THAYER & CO. 

144 Tremont Street, Boston. 

HOTEL TOURAINE, Boylston and Tremont Sts. 
PARKER HOUSE, School and Tremont Sts. 
YOUNG'S HOTEL, Court Street. 

y J. R. WHIPPLE CO., BOSTON. 

A. SHUMAN & CO., Boston 

Ladies' Suits made by Men Tailors, Ladies' Coats, Ladies' 
Waists. Ladies' Negligee Gowns and Sacques. Ladies' Un- 
derwear, Ladies' Hosiery, Ladies' Shoes, Ladies' Gloves, 
Ladies' Complete Outfits. ... ... 

Shuman Corner, Washington and Summer Streets. 

C. F. HOVEY & COMPANY, 
IFmporters of Dr? (Boobs. 



PARIS 

12 Rue Ambroise Thomas 



BOSTON 
33 Summer St. and 42 Avon Street 



BOSTON 



383 Boylston Street. 





mmwp 



Dyers 

Cleansers 
Launderers 

17 Temple Place Boston 



AN ETERNAL ANTITHESIS 

Is a pretty girl and an ugly room. Use Dennison's 
Crepe Paper. Cover the walls, drape the windows, 
mantel, tables and dresser with our dainty flower de- 
signs, and you and your room will be more in harmony. 
DENNISON MFG. CO.. 76 Franklin St., Boston. 

Paf*k Riding School, Ipswich Street. 

Six Instructors— Best Methods. 

Largest Ring in New England. Stable 250 Horses. 
For Terms apply to 

MONTAGUE TALLACK, Lessee and Manager, 

Telephone, 1541 Back Bay. 

DOMINION LINE FAST Vt^i??™™* 

BOSTON TO LIVERPOOL (Via Queenstown), 

Sailing every Saturday from Pier 7, Hoosac Tunnel Docks, Charlestown 

Vancouver, June 7. 

Saloon Rates §65 to $80 upwards according to steamer. 

MEDITERRANEAN SERVICE. Boston direct to Gibraltar, Genoa, 

Naples. Saloon rates, $75 upwards. Second Saloon, $50 and $60. 

For further information appiy to or address 
RICHARDS, MILLS & CO., 77-81 state street, boston. 

If you would know the 

MOST DELICIOUS TABLE WATER, 
order 

LP N DO N D E R RY. 

It's a FOWNE3' 

That's all you 
need to know about 
a glove 



COLLEGE NEWS 



COLLEGE NOTES. 



Dr. Barker and The Eliot 

at Home 

Monday afternoon, June the ninth 

From four until five o'clock. 



Miss Hazard spent last Sunday in her new house. 



Miss Hazard has sent invitations to members of the Faculty and 
a few friends to a reception in her home on Friday evening, 
June 6. 

As usual on Tree Day, the Seniors were entertained at Xorum- 
bega, the Alumna? at Wood and Freeman, and the Undergradu- 
ates at their respective houses. f 



At the Agora meeting held last Monday evening, extempora- 
neous speeches were : 

" The Birth the of the Cuban Nation, " Florence Barth 

" The Debate in the Senate on the Philippine Bill," Day Landis 
" The Terms of the Boer Peace," Harriet Wilcox 

The regular program was a meeting of the House of Commons. 
Speaker, Jessie Hutsinpillar 

Estelle Kramer, the member from Hull introduced a Discussion 
of the Combining of Shipping Interests. 

Louise Allen, the member from Burd, defended the Combina- 
tion. 

Florence Barth, the member from Lancashire, asked for a 
Report of the Government in Relation to The Terms of Peace 

Harriet Wilcox, as Mr. Balfour, read the Terms of Peace. 

Kate Lord, the member from Lynn, opposed the Terms of 
Peace on the ground of excessive expenditure. 

Sophie Brown, the member from Cork, opposed granting the 
Boers S elf-Government. 

Elizabeth Sperry, appealed to the house to support the Govern- 
ment in the Terms of Peace. 



The Philadelphia Wellesley Club. 



The Philadelphia Wellesley Club had its annual business meeting 
and luncheon at The Normandie. on Saturday, May 17. Seventeen 
members were present. 

The election of officers resulted as follows : President, Miss 
Ruth Goodwin, '98; Vice President, Miss Alice Reeve. '99; Direct- 
ors, Mrs. Emily Leonard Carmichael, '89, and Mrs. Martha Ranson 
Saylor, '94-'96 ; Secretary, Treasurer, Miss Vinnie B. Bentley, 
'97. 

The adjournment of the business meeting was followed by the 
luncheon, in which the color scheme was the "Wellesley blue.'' 
On the menu cards was engraved a copy of the Wellesley College 
Seal. The afternoon was most delightful, and " L'o Alma Mater" 
was sung with much loyalty. 

Announcements. 

The newest fashions in Shoes and Slippers for Class Day can be 
found at the store of H. B. Thayer & Co., 144 Tremont street. 

When purchasing, ask for the Velvet Grip Hose Supporter. It has 
no equal. 

Hotel Lenox wishes to announce that Commencement guests will 
receive special attention from their management. 

Take advantage of the 20% discount offered students by VICTOIRE, 
344 Boylston street, Boston, on the latest models in Hats. 

Sheeve, Chump & Low, Boston, Jewelers, authorized makers of 
the Wellesley Seal Pin. 

Rothe, 493 Washington street, furnishes wigs and make-up for 
Wellesley theatricals. 

OST E O PAT H Y. 



This new profession offers an unusally fine oppor- 
tunity for college women. 

Write for Osteopathic Literature and Catalogue to 
F. M. SLAGLE, Dean, 

ADA A. ACHORN, D. O., 697 Huntington Ave., Boston 

178 Huntington Ave., Boston. 



TO LET. 

In Wellesley, from July 
1 to September 15, at rea- 
sonable rates, a furnished 
house of eight rooms, in 
a pleasant situation. 
Address, Box 277, 
College, 
Wellesley, Mass. 

Woodland Park Hotel, 
Quite Near the College. 

SUITES WITH BATH. 

Tel. 8 1.2 West Newton. 
C. C. BUTLER, Proprietor. 





of 344 Boylston St., Boston. 

Summer Panama Hats, 

From $2.00 up. 

Finest Things for Golf and 
Country Wear. 
Special Rates to Students. 



SPRING CARRIAGES 
TO SUIT. 

"You know the Name - 
The Name tells the Story." 

AUR Spring Innovations 
'"■^ were never so inviting. 
For forty seasons FRENCH 
( now Summer Street ) has 
brought out the types of 
PLEASURE CARRIAGES 
which have proven the standard 
in character, excellence and 
value. 

If you want the cleverest in 
design and the best in work- 
manship and material, we 
are at your service, and 
guarantee satisfaction 



The French Carriage Go. 

FERDINAND F. FRENCH. 
Designers, Builders, Distributors 

83-85 SUMMER STREET. 




Copyrighted by Aime Dupont, N. Y. 



MME. EAMES, 

The Renowned 
Prima Donna, 

Endorses the Simplex 



March 26th, 1902. 
Theodore P. Brown. 

Dear Sir : I have heard 
with the greatest pleasure 
your Simplex Piano Play- 
er. I am glad to be able 
to say to you that it pos- 
sesses all the qualities of 
other Mechanical Piano 
attachments and besides 
that has a softness and 
elasticity of touch that I 
have found in no other 
that I have heard. It is 
a genuine pleasure to use 
it. Yours truly, 



You can learn to 
the SIMPLEX 



hVa ^crn^^, * \irruJ 




T 
H 

E 



S 



IMPLEX 



TRADE 
MARK 



PIANO 
LAYER 



HAS RECEIVED THE 
HEARTY APPROVAL. OE 
ALL THE GREAT ARTISTS 
OF THE METROPOLITAN 
GRAND OPERA COMPANY 



THEODORE P. BROWN, manufacturer, 

18 May Street, Worcester, Mass. 

WALTER J. BATES CO., 123 Boylston Street, 

LOCAL REPRESENTATIVE. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



5 



COURSE S FO R 1902-3. 

An outline of courses in economics and sociology for next year 
has been posted, and indicates many attractive courses. The work 
will be divided as follows : 

Course one: Economics, an introductory course, designed to 
give the student some acquaintance with economic facts training 
in economic reasoning; conducted by Miss Whittlesey. Course 
two: Industrial history of the United States, a study of national 
development in its material and social aspects, accompanied by a 
critical review of our economic legislation, commercial and finan- 
cial, — this work to be in charge of Miss Whittlesey and Professor 
Dewey. Course rive: Statistical study of certain economic prob- 
lems in the industrial hi-tory of the United States; this course 
will be given under Miss Whittlesey and will be introduced by 
lectures on the principles of statistical research, each member of 
the class undertaking the investigation of a particular problem, the 
results of which are reportedto the class. The graphic method of 
presenting statistics will be emphasized in the study. 

Social economics I and II, courses six and seven, will be given, 
by Miss Balch. The first semester's study will be devoted to the 
subject of the delinquent, defective and dependent c'asses, accom- 
panied by a discussion of the methods of dealing with each ; in the 
second semester a discussion will be taken up as to the methods of 
meeting certain normal social needs, such as housing, sanitation, 
education, recreation, and thrift. Course eight will take up the 
modern labor problem, with a study of the various remedies, pro- 
posed or tried, for the difficulties of the modern industrial situa- 
tion. — modifications of or substitutes for the wage system, such as 
profit sharing, co-operation, trade unionism, arbitration, labor 
legislation, insurance and pension schemes, — with special emphasis 
on the American experience. This course will be in charge of 
Miss Balch. as well as the following course nine, an introduction 
to general sociology, embracing a study of facts and theories of 
social development, and more especially of the growth of institu- 
tions, such as the family, the state, law, and property. 

A course in business methods and business law, similar to that 
given this year, will be conducted by Miss Caroline J. Cook. This 
study is intended to train women to deal intelligently with ordin- 
ary business situations. Class work will be supplemented by illus- 
trative lectures from practical business men. 

Pop Concert, Saturday, June 7. 

PROGRAMME. 

1. Makch, "Queen of Sheba " Gounod 

2. Ovebtuke, '-Si j'etaise Roi" Adam 

3. Waltz, "Artist's Life" Strauss 

4. Selection, " The Serenade" Herbert 

5. Overture, " Zampa" He'rold 

6. a. Elegie I „, , 
b. Legato \~ Strube 

( The audience is respectfully requested to preserve silence dur- 
ing the performance of this number.} 

7. Entree Teiomphale Des Boyards ...Halvorsen 

8. Rhapsody in F Liszt 

9. American Fantasie Herbert 

10. Two Movements from Suite, "PeerGynt" Grieg 

11. WAltz, " Jolly Fellows " Vollsted't 

12. March, " Boccaccio " Suppe 



Brookline Riding Academy 



Tel. 
IO88-S 



Village Sq., Brookline, 

THOROUGHLY REHOVATED. 

TWO RINGS, SKIcSd. 

Closed Ring Again Enlarged 35 Feet. 



Open 8, A.M., to 10, P.M. 

Ladies taught either on Cross 
Saddle or Side Saddle. First- 
class saddle horses to let. 

Finest accommodation for 
boarding horses. 

Fifteen minutes from Park 

Square, Boston. R. CLASEN. 

Special Rates for Colleges, 

Schools and Teachers. 



EASTERN STEAMSHIP CO. 

Bangor Division. - Commencing Monday, May 5th, steamers leave 
Pier 368, Atlantic Avenue, Boston, at 5, P. M., daily, except Sundays, for 
Kockland, Camden, Belfast, Searsport, Bueksport, Winterport, Hampden 
and Bangor. 

For Stonington, So. West Harbor, No. East Harbor, Seal Harbor and Bar 
Harbor daily, except Sundays. 

Returning from Bangor Mondays at 12, M., other week days at 2, P. M. 
From Bar Harbor at 1, P. M., daily, except Sundays. 

Portland Division.— Steamers leave India Wharf at 7, P. M., daily, ex- 
cept Sunday, for Portland, connecting with rail and steamship lines for in- 
terior and coast points north and east; returning from Portland at 7, P. M., 
daily, except Sunday. 

International Division.— Commencing Monday, April 2*th, steamers 
leave Commercial Wharf at 8.1^, A. M., on Mondays, Wednesdavs and Fri- 
days for Portland, Eastport, Lubec, Calais and St. John, connecting with all 
provincial points. 

Returning, leave St. John at 7.30, A. M., via Eastport, Lubec and Portland, 
on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. 

Kennebec Division.— Steamers leave Union Wharf, at 6, P. M., on 
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays for Bath, Richmond, Gardiner, Hallo- 
well and Augusta. 

Returning from Augusta at 1, P. M., via Hallowell, Gardiner, Richmond 
and Bath, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. 

Connections are made at Bath with the Boothbay Division both to and from 
Boothbay Harbor, and intermediate landings. 
Through tickets sold and baggage checked through. 

CALVIN AUSTIN, Vice-Pres. & Gen'l Manager, 36S Atlantic Ave., Boston, 



RAY 



FOR WOMEN 
Waists, Stocks, Belts, Collars, 
Gloves, 

Outfitter to Men and Women. 
509 Washington St., Cor. West. Boston. 



lov/KEfs 



CHOCOLATES 
SO and 60c per lb. 



DELICIOUS— DAINTY— PURE. 
416 Washington St., (4th door North of Summer St. 



Miss H. E. TIBBETtS, 

209 Huntington Ave., 

boston, mass. 

©inner, Ilea ano Evening (Sowne. 

MILLS & DEERING, 
Butter, Cheese p$P Eggs, 

Stalls : 22 and 24 Quincy Market, 




Bonbons and Chocolates, 
146 Tremont St. 

GEO. P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costume ■'■■ Parlors, 

17 Boylston Place, Boston. 

Costumes tor private theatricals 
and Costume parties. 

B. HURWITCH, 

Ladies' Tailor and 
Fashionable Dressmaker, 

134 Castle Street, Boston 
John TV Morgan St Co. 

PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, Wellesley, Mass. 

"TOM" GRIFFIN 

Carriage at Station on arrival of 
trains, Order Box at north door of 
College Hall, Reliable Horses and 
Carriages to let. Baggage trans- 
ferred. 

Telephone. 

3eweler0 anfc 

Established 1868. ©pttClSltS* 

Oculists' Prescriptions Promptly- 
Filled. High Grade Repairing a 
Specialty. We are Agents for Water- 
man's Ideal Fountain Pen. 

J. H. WASHBURN CO. 

41 Main St.. Natick, Mass. 

T. D. COOK & CO. 

CATERERS, 

Teas 
and Spreads. 



HOLDEN'S STUDIO, 

20 JSTo. Ave., Natick, 

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS. 

Connected by Telephone. 

Qassius (T). Jte|l, 

Successor to A. B. Clark, 

THE GROCER, 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

Hiss Stasia Enright, 

Manicuring, Shampooing, Ar- 
tistic Hair Dressing, Dealer 
in Hair Goods and Toilet 
Articles, Facial Treatments- 
Marcel Wave a specialty. 
2 A Park St., Room 3, Boston. 

F. A. Coolidge & Co., 

Dealers in 

Choice Meats and Provisions. 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

J. TAILBY & SON, 
FLORISTS, 

Wellesley, Opp. R. R. Station, 

Orders by mail or otherwise 
promptly attended to. Con- 
nected by Telephone. 

ClelanJ) & 1Hn&erwoo&, 

NATICK, MASS. 

Special " Big Value " Morris Chairs,. 
$5.00; Tea Tables, Fancy Screens,. 
Scrap Baskets, Couch Covers, Jar- 
dinieres, Jardiniere Stands. 
Our teams deliver free. 

fl. Q. SLATTERY, 
Theatrical Wigs & Make-up 

Wigs, Switches, Curls, Pompa- 
dour Rolls to order. 

226 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Near Touraine. 




COLLEGE NEWS 



College Settlements Association Fellowships. 



The College Settlements Association lias established Ta-o Fellow- 
ships of $400 each for the jear 1902-1903, and invites application 
tln-refor. One of these Fellowships may. at the discretion of the 
committee, be changed into a Scholarship of $300. 

The object of these Fellowships is to open to a well-qualified 
person the opportunity afforded by settlement life for investigation 
of social conditions. The object of the Scholarship is to give train- 
ing in philanthropic, and civic work. 

No requirements are made beyond residence in a settlement dur- 
ing the academic year and the pursuit of some elearlj' denned line 
of work, scientific or practical, under the general guidance of ihe 
undersigned committee of this Association and of the Headworker 
of the Settlement selected. The choice of residence should depend 
on opportunities for the work to 'ie undertaken, and need not be 
limited to the houses belonging to this Association. The time may, 
with the approval of the Committee, be divided between different 
settlements. 

The basis of award will be solely promise of future usefulness. 
A college education is regarded as desirable but not essential if 
some compensating form of intellectual discipline has been en- 
joyed. Applicants should perferably have had some experience, 
and very recent college graduates would be eligible only in excep- 
tional cases. Qualifications being equal, a woman applicant will 
be preferable to a man. 

Applications should be sent before July fifteenth, to Mrs Herbert 
Parsons, 112 East 35th street. Xew York City. These should in- 
clude all data that might be of use to the Committee. Applicants 
should give age, some account of previous education, and state the 
future work to which they are looking forward. They should also 
describe as specifically as possible what topic or line of work they 
have in mind for their fellowship year. Applications should be ac- 
companied by credentials bearing on character, on ability, practical 
and scholarly, and on health. 

It will be regarded as a service if those to whom this notice 
comes will bring it to the attention of persons who might care to 
apply. 

Committee on Fellowships College Settlements Associations , 

Chairman, MES. HERBERT PARSONS, 

Barnard College 
MISS E. G BALCH, 

Wellesley College, 
DR. ALVIN S. JOHNSON, 
Columbia University. 

THOS. O'CAL/LAGrHAN & CO., 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

Fine Carpetings, Rugs and Upholstery, 

Have Removed to their New Location, 

30 to 38 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON. 

We can Exterminate every Roach or Water Bug 

From Your Building. Insecticide Work Guaranteed. 

G. B. DeLue & CO., 376 Washington Street, Boston. 

BOSTON AND HAINE RAILROAD. 

Lowest Rates. Fast Train Service between Boston and Chica- 
go, St Louis, St. Paul, Minneapolis and all points West, North- 
west and Southwest. 

Pullman Parlor or Sleeping Cars on alt through trains. For tickets and 
information apply at any principal t'eket office of the company. 

D. J. FLANDERS,' Gen'l Pass, and Tkt. Agt., Boston. 



ELM PARK HOTEL, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Will take guests for commencement. Ten minutes by electrics 

SPECIAL RATES. TEL 182-2. to the door. 

M. ROWE, Proprietor. 

UUNCH EON. 
Nelson L. Martin. OAK GROVE CREAMERY CO, 

445 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

Everything we serve in our Diniij 



that can be bought, re 



Room is the choicest and best 
sfardless of price. 



The Berkeley Hotel, 

Berkeley and Boylston Streets. 
Modern in Every Detail. 

Restaurant for Ladies. Entrance on Boylston Street. 
JOHN A. SHERLOCK. 

OAINDIES 

A bargain for every day in the week. Cream 
Mints is one of them. Two days in each 
week we will sell the finest kind of Cream 
Mints for 19c. Sold all over Boston for 40c. 

Zbe S>. S. McDonalo Co., 

16 Winter St., and 131 and 132 Tremont St. 

LONDON HARNESS STORE CO., 200 Devonshire Street. 



" Boston's Leading Saddlers." 




Sole Agents for 



Mayhew's Safety Improved 
Grip Side Saddle. 



The safest, most perfect and most practical Ladies' Saddle made. 
Now being used in and about Boston to the exclusion of all others. 
Importers and makers of Traveling Bags, Card Cases, Pocket Books 
and novelties in Pig Skin and other fancy leathers. 



M adame May & O . 

ELECTRO TONIC FACE TREATMENTS, 
MANICURE, PEDICURE, HAIR DRESS- 
ING, TOILET ARTICLES. 

15 Temple Place, Boston 



F7INEST Passenger Train service over 
* the only "Double Track" Route, 
between Boston, Albany and the west. 

A. S. HANSON, Gen'l. Pass. Agent. 




B. T. SLATTERY COMPANY, 

Tailored Gowns SPRING REDUCTION SALE Pedestrian Suits 

Qualities that were $30.00 to $35.00, now $20.00 Qualities that were $25.00 to $35.00, now $20 00 

Qualities that were $37.00 to $40.00, now $25.00 Qualities that were $37.50 to $42.00, now $25.00 

Silk and Wash Waists. Millinery at very REDUCED Prices. 

Neckwear, Neck Ruffs — Our Large and Varied Assortment at 25 per cent. Discount. 

154 AND 155 TREMONT STREET. 

Usual tO per cent, discount to Wellesley College Students and Faculty.